Wednesday, June 29, 2011






As a literary manager, Dr. Ken Atchity has launched many illustrious careers for novelists, writers of nonfiction and screenwriters.

He’s also produced 28 films and authored 14 books, including “A Writer’s Time: Making Time to Write” and “Writing Treatments That Sell.”

With credits like these and over 40 years experience in publishing, it’s safe to say that Ken knows the business.

This is precisely why I wanted to speak with him about the radical changes in the publishing environment and what it means to today’s writers.

Here’s the interview:

There’s been drastic change in the publishing world over the last several years. What does this mean for today’s aspiring novelists?

It means that today’s novelists are living on a new frontier, and are free to seize opportunity where they find it—and take their fate into their own hands. They are no longer enslaved by a publishing paradigm that never made good business sense. In short, go Internet, young novelist!

What are your thoughts on novelists self-publishing their work in e-book form?

That is not only the way of the future, it’s the way of the present! It’s the paradigm that’s already working for hundreds of writers. Soon it will work for thousands. Be the next one on your block to publish an ebook.

Is there still a stigma tied to self-publishing? And, if so, should writers care?

Not in the least, as long as it’s done professionally with the highest artistic standards and commercial intelligence.

What kind of sales would an author have to demonstrate in order to gain interest from a traditional publishing house?

Once you’re north of 10,000 sales or so, you have a chance of the traditional publishers taking you seriously because you’ve proven there IS a market for your book.

If an independent author is making healthy sales on his own, what reasons would he have to sign with a traditional publisher?

That’s really the question. If money is your goal, you’re making more by far on the esales than you would make from a traditional publisher at that point.

If fame, then maybe you consider switching to the traditional publisher so you can say you were “published by W. W. Norton.” But you will lose control over your book if you do that.

Basically, the only reason that makes sense for going traditional at that point is the kind of irresistible advance Amanda Hocking got from St. Martin’s–$2 million!

At what point (if any), would you recommend that a new novelist who has published their book in electronic format consider publishing in paper- or hardback?

This is primarily a question of whether the new novelist has access to physical audiences that will buy her book. If he does, then go to Print on Demand (P.O.D.) and order enough books for each event you attend. Plus, you need “hard copies” to sign!

If self publishing, what are some of the tasks a writer should perform before launching their books?

(1) Make sure your book is professionally edited. Most self-published books are not, and readers get angry and stop buying them.

(2) Hire a professional designer for the cover—one who’s worked for the traditional publishing houses.

(3) Make sure you have a marketing plan, no matter how minimal—and implement it every single day. Hire a web publicist who knows what he’s doing—or a strategic career coach like myself (www.storymerchant.com).

Where do you think most writers go wrong when self-publishing their books?

They do it through organizations that add unnecessary expense to the writer’s investment instead of doing it “direct” with Kindle, I-books, Lightning Source, etc.

Now that anyone and everyone can publish themselves (& often do), what can an author with a quality product do to stand out?

Publicity and marketing. The more inventive you are, the better. That’s why it’s a new frontier—the prize goes to the most creative.

Thanks for your time, Ken! Informative interview. :)

Thanks, Jen. Keep up the good work!

To find out more about Dr. Ken Atchity, you can find him at aeionline.com and storymerchant.com.

Did you enjoy this interview? If so, share it with your friends, using one of the buttons below! You can also sign up for our free Weekly Update. You’ll receive more interviews like these as well as several of articles on the craft and business of writing!


Interview by Jennifer Minar-Jaynes. Jennifer Minar-Jaynes is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer and the editor-in-chief of www.WritersBreak.com.

Monday, June 27, 2011

SUPREME JUSTICE INSPIRED BY LITERATURE [via Nina Reznick]


Keep the Briefs Brief, Literary Justices Advise


WASHINGTON — Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, whose writing is clear but dry, said her style owed something to Vladimir Nabokov, the author of “Lolita.”

Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said her writing style owed something to Nabokov, from whom she took a course at Cornell.


Tim Sloan/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Justice Antonin Scalia said he used the occasional pun.

Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, whose opinions can meander, said he aspired to Ernest Hemingway’s stripped-down language, sharing his distaste for adverbs.

Justice Stephen G. Breyer, who has been known to cite foreign law in his opinions, said he looked abroad for literary inspiration, mentioning Montesquieu, Wittgenstein, Stendhal and Proust.

Justice Clarence Thomas said a good brief reminded him of the television show “24.”

In a trove of interviews that are to Supreme Court obsessives what the State Department cables released by WikiLeaks were to students of American foreign policy, eight Supreme Court justices described how they write their opinions, what they look for in briefs and the art of legal writing generally.

The interviews, which had been available only as videos on the Web site of a company that tries to teach lawyers how to write, have just now been published in The Scribes Journal of Legal Writing.

Since the interviews were first posted in 2008, they were little noticed except by Supreme Court advocates, who have studied and dissected them. At least one leading law firm prepared its own informal transcripts.

The justices turn out to be a surprisingly literary bunch. Justice Kennedy, the court’s swing justice, had barely started talking when he began quoting from Hamlet, and he went on to discuss Dickens, Trollope, Faulkner and Solzhenitsyn.

Justice Ginsburg said she had learned much from a course Nabokov taught at Cornell on European literature.

“He was a man in love with the sound of words,” she said of her former professor. “He changed the way I read, the way I write.”

Justice Thomas, on the other hand, cited only a single author, and then only by way of contrast. “It’s not a mystery novel,” he said of a good brief. “People can’t think, ‘I’m Agatha Christie,’ or something like that.”

Read More

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Encourage Creativity Through Storytelling


http://www.carolinaparent.com

Written by: Royce Buckingham

Every child has the potential to be a creative storyteller, an important skill parents can nurture. As the children's fantasy author of "Demonkeeper," "Goblins" and the upcoming book "The Dead Boys," I have helped hundreds of students, and my own boys, bring their imaginations to life through stories. Below are some tips to try with your children. These are the same simple techniques that I use to create my own books, and they will make a tremendous difference in your child's storytelling.

I often hear that when children sit down to write a story they are blocked by the imposing wall that is the blank page. My deceptively simple solution: Take away the wall.

Draw on imagination

Children have active imaginations and a natural ability to make up stories. Just ask them this question: "What would you do if [fill in the blank] happened?" And watch them go. This is my first bit of advice — start with oral storytelling.

Help your child get the story straight in her or his head, share it and get feedback before writing a single word. This teaches the child at least four primary story development skills: outlining, finishing, seeking feedback and editing.

For oral storytelling, ask your son or daughter to think up a simple "What if [fill in the blank] happened?" Then invite the child to answer these three basic questions:
- What character would be the most fun to put in that situation?
- What is the character's problem?
- How does the character solve it in a creative way?

Encourage your child to try several different answers for each question and then pick her favorite. Feel free to contribute examples if the child gets stuck. As soon as the child answers these questions — voilá — it's a story.
Now ask for a different "What if...?" and repeat the process. Have your child create three of these oral stories, making it a fun game.

Tell the story out loud

After creating three stories, have your child pick a favorite story and tell it to as many people as possible, each time in three minutes or less. Allow your child to add details, change it and eliminate parts that don't sound right. The story may grow or tighten. The trick is to tell it over and over in three-minute increments and smooth it out orally.

As the story changes, your child is learning to edit. Yes, edit — that scary chore so many writers dread! Changes in oral stories, however, are natural and painless, since there's nothing to erase.

Have your child keep telling the story to others. When the story sounds right to the child and to the last person told, it is ready to write down.
This process usually takes me about three to six months (no joke). I don't write a single word until I know my story by heart. Of course, I don't recommend six months for a child. Just be sure to have the youngster tell the story enough times that the kinks are worked out and he can tell it smoothly so that it makes sense.

Now your child is ready to write ... one sentence.

Writing is the last step

Have your son or daughter jot down the story as a single sentence including only the three basics: the character, the problem, and what the character must do to solve it. For example:
When Billy, a first-grader, discovers his school has vanished, he must find it by following the clues left behind on the playground.

Your child will recognize when the written sentence is right, because she has told the story over and over. Now celebrate!

Once children can write compelling one-sentence stories, they graduate to a paragraph. If this goes well, move on to a one-page summary. And when they can describe a story in these abbreviated written forms, then have them try it as a short story. Small steps first. Novels later. And trust me, knowing the story first will make the writing part much easier for the child later.

Your child should stop at each stage to celebrate, share and receive feedback. Soon your son or daughter will have a great story and a great story-creation technique.

That's it. That's how I do it, and that's how I teach children to do it. It's a good way to prepare kids for school, it's free, and composing a great story together is a creative way to bond with your child.



Saturday, June 25, 2011

Dr. Ken Atchity Discusses the New Frontier of Publishing and What It Means for Writers






As a literary manager, Dr. Ken Atchity has launched many illustrious careers for novelists, writers of nonfiction and screenwriters.

He’s also produced 28 films and authored 14 books, including “A Writer’s Time: Making Time to Write” and “Writing Treatments That Sell.”

With credits like these and over 40 years experience in publishing, it’s safe to say that Ken knows the business.

This is precisely why I wanted to speak with him about the radical changes in the publishing environment and what it means to today’s writers.

Here’s the interview:

There’s been drastic change in the publishing world over the last several years. What does this mean for today’s aspiring novelists?

It means that today’s novelists are living on a new frontier, and are free to seize opportunity where they find it—and take their fate into their own hands. They are no longer enslaved by a publishing paradigm that never made good business sense. In short, go Internet, young novelist!

What are your thoughts on novelists self-publishing their work in e-book form?

That is not only the way of the future, it’s the way of the present! It’s the paradigm that’s already working for hundreds of writers. Soon it will work for thousands. Be the next one on your block to publish an ebook.

Is there still a stigma tied to self-publishing? And, if so, should writers care?

Not in the least, as long as it’s done professionally with the highest artistic standards and commercial intelligence.

What kind of sales would an author have to demonstrate in order to gain interest from a traditional publishing house?

Once you’re north of 10,000 sales or so, you have a chance of the traditional publishers taking you seriously because you’ve proven there IS a market for your book.

If an independent author is making healthy sales on his own, what reasons would he have to sign with a traditional publisher?

That’s really the question. If money is your goal, you’re making more by far on the esales than you would make from a traditional publisher at that point.

If fame, then maybe you consider switching to the traditional publisher so you can say you were “published by W. W. Norton.” But you will lose control over your book if you do that.

Basically, the only reason that makes sense for going traditional at that point is the kind of irresistible advance Amanda Hocking got from St. Martin’s–$2 million!

At what point (if any), would you recommend that a new novelist who has published their book in electronic format consider publishing in paper- or hardback?

This is primarily a question of whether the new novelist has access to physical audiences that will buy her book. If he does, then go to Print on Demand (P.O.D.) and order enough books for each event you attend. Plus, you need “hard copies” to sign!

If self publishing, what are some of the tasks a writer should perform before launching their books?

(1) Make sure your book is professionally edited. Most self-published books are not, and readers get angry and stop buying them.

(2) Hire a professional designer for the cover—one who’s worked for the traditional publishing houses.

(3) Make sure you have a marketing plan, no matter how minimal—and implement it every single day. Hire a web publicist who knows what he’s doing—or a strategic career coach like myself (www.storymerchant.com).

Where do you think most writers go wrong when self-publishing their books?

They do it through organizations that add unnecessary expense to the writer’s investment instead of doing it “direct” with Kindle, I-books, Lightning Source, etc.

Now that anyone and everyone can publish themselves (& often do), what can an author with a quality product do to stand out?

Publicity and marketing. The more inventive you are, the better. That’s why it’s a new frontier—the prize goes to the most creative.

Thanks for your time, Ken! Informative interview. :)

Thanks, Jen. Keep up the good work!

To find out more about Dr. Ken Atchity, you can find him at aeionline.com and storymerchant.com.

Did you enjoy this interview? If so, share it with your friends, using one of the buttons below! You can also sign up for our free Weekly Update. You’ll receive more interviews like these as well as several of articles on the craft and business of writing!


Interview by Jennifer Minar-Jaynes. Jennifer Minar-Jaynes is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer and the editor-in-chief of www.WritersBreak.com.

Friday, June 24, 2011

THE PLIGHT OF THE SECOND NOVEL [via Katherine Taylor]


My Editor, My Wife


Last June, I finally got up the nerve to show my wife the novel I'd been working on for almost four years. I didn't want to—not yet—but after several deadline extensions, I had two months to deliver a finished manuscript to my publisher.

"Will you help me?" I said.

"Do I have a choice?"

Deborah and I met in 1993, in the graduate creative writing program at Ohio State. She was a year behind me but four years older, with a tangle of thick brown hair and a long, sure stride. I found her irresistible from the first time she blew me off, at a professor's party for new students. I'd been assigned to be her mentor; she had no interest in being my mentee. I remember thinking—hoping—she'd give me my due once she read my work. And she did. But it was Deborah who turned out to be, hands down, the best writer in the program, as well as a brilliant reader. We became friends over bottles of High Life with the other MFAs in the sticky booths at Larry's Bar, building the trust you need to give and take criticism. And then, like a surprise ending that in hindsight seems inevitable, we fell in love.

Since then, Deborah has edited every piece of prose I've written. Though her criticisms are often less than gentle ("I'm going to throw up" is a representative margin note), she makes my work better. Much, much better. I save her marked-up manuscripts as an unluckier husband might save love letters.

But this manuscript wasn't ready to be marked up. It sat on our bedroom dresser, unread, as the clock ticked. Even though we weren't in the habit of talking about my work-in-progress, the fact that after all this time I hadn't shown her any pages made it perfectly clear that the book was a mess.

My first novel had gotten good reviews and sold, for a first novel, reasonably well; I wanted to do better this time. At the very least, I wanted not to go backward. This novel's success would also impact my next book deal—hell, it might determine whether there would be a next one. And then there was Deborah. She works as a high-level editor at a major magazine; I didn't want to put her in the position of walking into the office the wife of second-rate novelist. The prospect of embarrassing her—of being anything less than a husband she might feel the urge to brag about—was even worse than the prospect of embarrassing myself.

***


After three days, she started reading.

"There's some good stuff here," she said, "but it needs a lot of work. A lot."

So much work, in fact, that when she finished reading, we seriously discussed killing the deal. Better to pay back the advance than publish a novel before it was ready, right? But I'd long since spent the advance. Not turning the book in, or turning it in and having it rejected, would have meant paying back money I no longer had.

Read More Here


Monday, June 20, 2011

Class Personal Development Reviews AEI CLients Gary and Joy Lundberg's You Don't Have to Make Everything All Better

Stop Emotional Manipulation

by Susan Gilbert http://www.getclass.org/tips-from-our-faculty/

I Don’t Have to Make Everything All Better :
Six Practical Principles to Empower Others to Solve Their Own Problems While Enriching Your Relationships


-Gary and Joy Lundberg

(This Blog is a Book Review/Recommendation for anyone who wants to improve all relationships. The book came out in 2000, and is still the most powerful and useful presentation of the nature of human emotions I have ever read and I have used it for years in therapy and in my own personal life.)

When you finally learn how emotions work, and you stop trying to control them in yourself and others, life becomes much easier—and it makes a whole lot more sense.
One reviewer on Amazon talks about how powerful it was for him to realize that he could let others come up with their own answers, and just validate their emotions. The powerful realization came to him that when you allow people to feel their emotions, and just validate them, YOU CANNOT BE EMOTIONALLY MANIPULATED!!! He says in his review that he feels like he’s just come out of a coma….

I spent $175 this month on a class on Emotional Manipulation—a class for therapists. The summary is—when you stop trying to manage or control other peoples’ emotions, they cannot manipulate you. Feelings are just feelings. They come and go. They are based on what we believe is happening, and on our past experiences. Emotions are floods of chemicals that flow through our bodies—if you just wait awhile, the emotion (chemical flow) subsides. What people really want from you is empathy and understanding.

The message a person gets when you listen and validate the emotion is “You’re an important person, and I’m here for you.” Try giving yourself permission to be human and have human emotions. It’s wonderful. “Even though I totally screwed up my project (marriage, life, etc.), I’m a student of life, learning and growing, and I deeply love and respect myself.” You’ll be surprised how quickly negatives dissolve, and great ideas and solutions start coming to you.

Read the book! It could change your life…

-Susan

Friday, June 17, 2011

Story Merchant Client Royce Buckingham Makes a Two Book Deal with Macmillin Films


Deals: Week of 6/13/2011



Buckingham Goes In for Two at Macmillan Films

Royce Buckingham sold two books to Brendan Deneen at Thomas Dunne Books. Ken Atchity at Story Merchant brokered the world rights deal. In the first book, a thriller called A Week of Mondays, a Seattle bike messenger loses his job and forgets to make his last delivery, which causes more trouble than the beleaguered hero ever expected. The story originated with Deneen, and Macmillan Films is attached to the project. The second book, The Terminals, to which Macmillan Films, Ken Atchity and Chi-Li Wong are also attached, is a YA novel about a bunch of teenagers with life-threatening diseases who are recruited to complete dangerous missions by a government agency; Deneen called it "a Bourne Identity for the YA crowd."

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Interview With AEI Client Dennis Palumbo For Kings River Life Magazine

IN THE May 21 ISSUE

FROM THE Marilyn Meredith,
andMysteryrat's Maze,
andPat Browning,
andRegional Reviewers SECTIONS

by Marilyn Meredith
& Pat Browning

Marilyn Meredith had the pleasure recently of interviewing mystery author Dennis Palumbo. After the interview is a review of his first mystery novel, Mirror Image, by Pat Browning and details on how to enter for a chance to win a copy of this book. Read Interview Here

Monday, June 13, 2011

Just Show Up! Ridgely Goldsborough


A View From the Ridge

Just show up.

Some days I wake up plain dog-tired.
I lack the customary zest and zeal that characterizes most mornings, for no apparent cause or reason.
If I had my druthers, I’d like nothing better than to roll back over and cozy up to my favorite pillow.

Instead, I drag the ol’ carcass into the kitchen to hunt up some comfort food, to see if I can incite a change of mood.
Nothing like a cholesterol-laden plate of eggs buttressed by two slabs of butter-smothered toast to lighten the spirit—and contribute to my general malaise.
Now, with a plump, full belly, I can add sluggish to my general state.
Talk about a winning combination!

Unfortunately, as for most of us, life doesn’t grant me the luxury of lounging at will.
Duty calls, as they say—the job, the kids, the deadline—whatever form that duty takes.
I have to find some way of banishing that glorious image of a sloth clinging wistfully to a log into the recesses of my imagination and get a move on.
Yuck!

Over the years, I’ve figured out a magic formula.
Trick number one to shifting our brain out of neutral and into gear is actually quite simple:
Just show up.

Find a way to drag your body to your station and man it.
Once in place, take one tiny, reluctant step at a time and embark.
In the absence of inspiration, nothing beats inertia faster than motion.

Much like the sun melts the daybreak dew, motion has a way of lifting the fog socked around the brain.
Mental gears begin to engage, creative sockets begrudgingly open, we start to fire on more than one cylinder.
As the fog turns to mist and evaporates, clarity takes hold.
“Hey, I do have a purpose, today. Time to move in that direction.”

Not every day can be a championship day.
More often than not, most of us take solace at even being on the playing field.
Beware of berating yourself.
Overachievers tend to ignore their humanity and underachievers crack the whip on their backs.

Give yourself a break.
Let yourself be human.
If it feels like a Krispy Kreme morning, have an extra cup of coffee to counteract the sugar.

When you pull out of your driveway, play your favorite song and play it really loud.
Sing along.
See if you can’t extract a hint of a smile from that scowl.
When you get into motion the world moves with you.

Funny how some of my best days start out in a thick haze.
The transition from “can’t get myself out of bed” to “okay, fine—one more day at the mill” to “wow, I think I’m liking what’s flowing” doesn’t always happen easily or painlessly.
Some days it doesn’t happen at all.

I know that I give myself the best possible chance when I take that one fundamental requirement:
I show up.

That’s A View From The Ridge…


Ridgely



Success Quotes

The world is run by people who show up.

- Brad McClain


To bring oneself to a frame of mind and to the proper energy to accomplish things that require plain hard work continuously is the one big battle that everyone has. When this battle is won for all time, then everything is easy.

- Thomas A. Buckner


Key Points

I look out the window and on some days I see the sun shining on all of us. On other days, it doesn't and it seems as though the gray, rain-filled clouds take their sweet time before dissipating.

The wind blows gently and it is so refreshing. The wind howls and the cold finds a way through the thickest of coats.
The wind stops completely and an orange orb begins to bake us as we wish for the wind to pick back up.

So what? There are good days, funky days, and all sorts in between. Here's what I know.

The world is run by those who decide, despite the outward conditions and often despite the inward ones as well, to simply show up--show up for work, show up for duty, show up in their relationships, show up at the gym and sweat a little--even when they would rather be vegging out on a couch with a remote in hand.

Notice that I am not suggesting that they always feel like showing up or even want to--they just do it anyway, day after day, shift after shift.

Is this a guarantee of success? No, not by a long shot. It is merely the beginning. The opposite however, is most certainly a formula for failure. Try not showing up repeatedly for any task or endeavor and check your results. We all know what they will be.

This game called life is complicated enough in and of itself. If you want to play all out, at the very least you need to join the players on the field of practice.

Just show up...



Click here to order my latest book
-
The Great Ones--I promise that it will make a difference in your life and the lives of your loved ones!



Refer A Friend—send this FREE ezine to those you care about, with a personalized message from you.
Click here to send right away.


Our mailing address is:

A View From the Ridge

PO Box 34026

Pensacola, FL 32507


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Copyright (C) 2010 A View From the Ridge All rights reserved.

Sunday, June 12, 2011

Discovery orders Renegade83's hardcore reality competition 'One Man Army,' military's toughest face off --


by James Hibberd



See One Man Army Trailer on EW.com



Discovery is taking the competition series to a new extreme by pitting Special Forces and law enforcement personnel against each other in challenges that would be impossible for most reality TV contestants.

The network has ordered One Man Army, hosted by former Green Beret Mykel Hawke (Man, Woman Wild). Each episode features four new competitors, including men from the Navy Seals, Marines, Air Force, Army, U.S. Marshals Service, SWAT, and other law enforcement agencies, as well as top fighters from mixed-martial arts and other extreme sports.

The contestants compete in challenges like freeing themselves from a rope hanging them upside down, breaking through a series of walls, figuring out the best tactics to escape from a locked cell. The contestant with the slowest time will be eliminated until there’s only one man standing to claim at $10,000 prize. The show, produced by Renegade 83

http://insidetv.ew.com

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

New investors tap into Senator who picks up Hysteria in Cannes



http://www.variety.com


Dutch group buys 21% stake in German outfit



German producer-distrib Senator Entertainment appears headed for a change of ownership.

Dutch investment group Sapinda Holding, run by German investor Lars Windhorst, has obtained an option to acquire 21.2% of the company by Dec. 20...



... Senator just picked up a slew of titles in Cannes, among them Mike Newell's "Great Expectations," an adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic starring Jeremy Irvine, Helena Bonham Carter and Ralph Fiennes; Tanya Wexler's romantic comedy "Hysteria," starring Hugh Dancy and Maggie Gyllenhaal; and Curtis Hanson's "Mavericks," with Gerard Butler.


Contact Ed Meza at ed.meza@mannaa.de

Friday, June 3, 2011

Micheal J. Lee's Debut Fantasy novel available on Amazon

My Frankenstein retells the classic story by Mary Shelley as a dark romance with steampunk overtones.


PURCHASE NOW!





In a small village in early 19th Century young Eva is enthralled by the new young baron, Viktor Frankenstein. Viktor promises to transform the traditional little town into a beacon of science and gives the book loving Eva access to his fantastic library. Eva becomes his student and assists him in a secret experiment, though she is kept in the dark about its ultimate aim. Soon after that Viktor introduces Eva to his “cousin” Adam. Adam is horribly disfigured with stitches running across his face. Viktor claims he is mute and simpleminded, but Eva takes pity on him and sets out to teach him to speak.…

What follows is a combination of tragic romance and classic horror as Eva is pulled between Viktor, who grows jealous and takes murderous steps to ensure his secret, and Adam, who possess tremendous strength and rage yet deep inside is innocent and vulnerable.

Wednesday, June 1, 2011

AEI CLIENTS JOY and GARY LUNDBERG DISCOUNT THEIR BESTSELLING I DON’T HAVE TO MAKE EVERYTHING ALL BETTER

DISCOUNT on the popular book

"I Don't Have to Make Everything All Better"
by Gary and Joy Lundberg

Have you read this book? Do your adult children have a copy?

This is the perfect time to give it to yourself or someone else who needs to know the secret to truly happy relationships.

“Wonderful, wonderful book! I read it out loud with my husband and several times
we commented that it must have been written just for us! It has helped tremendously with our relationships with our children, especially our adult children and children-in-law. I highly recommend it.” — K. Bentley, UT

“Excellent Book . . . My life has changed because of this book. Great for clear honest communication without the need to fix anyone in your life. A must read.” — Felica Frestan, NY


Only $11.99 each
or
Two for $10.99 each